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May 21, 2007

Comments

Craig Persel

Excellent essay and food for thought. I'll have to stop and think about my images in this context.

I liked that 2nd image so much I copied it over to PS and played around a bit with some cropping. I took some off the left AND top to give it a somewhat panoramic composition. Seemed to work, but naturally not as well as it would have if the left end could have been saved. Still ... an excellent shot.

The last image is a killer. Has everything going for it with that wonderful spotlight and tonal qualities. In my opinion, a real masterpiece. The eye really does move around the image and return to the spotlighted man and dog.

Craig

Jeff Seltzer

Well said! I wonder how this image fits into the discussion?

http://www.pbase.com/jseltzer/image/56705068/large

Chuck

Jeff,

Cool image, I remember this one. My thoughts as pertains to this post are that the highlights seem fine and the only blocked up shadows are in the extreme bottom of the image. This could be due to an uncalibrated monitor, but as I see it, the bottom of the image goes pure black. The area of pure black for me is just large enough to be a discraction and give an unbalanced feel to the image.

Because this image is all about line and perspective, the fact that the bottom has no detail leaves me feeling like that part of the image is floating and not grounded structurally. I would think this good image could be stronger with more detail at the bottom.

This image actually leads me down the path of thinking more about tonal range than blown hightlights/blocked up shadows.

You have a captured a wonderful range of tones. I'm wondering if you dodged the floor a bit lighter and made the darkest parts of the image only the baseboard and doors. This might empasize the depth and perspective. Right now, that dark carpet is really competing for attention and it's the least interesting part of the image.

I'm wondering how you feel about how it fits into this discussion.
Chuck

Sam

Yes, but why not use software to get what you want with these images.

I've just done that with your first image.

Very often there is enough tones, whether we shoot JPEG or RAW, and sometimes regardless of the histogram's state:

http://thewhatandwhy.slashedcanvas.co.uk/2007/12/16/when-blocked-up-shadows-aren%e2%80%99t-really/

Burberry Outlet

This might empasize the depth and perspective. Right now, that dark carpet is really http://www.outletburberryoutlet.com competing for attention and it's the least interesting part of the image.

Office 2007

Ah well your comment! I did you good!

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